Five speakers highlighted during Friday Plenary session

Abel Torres, MD, JD

Abel Torres, MD, JD

Plan to attend one of the highlights of the 2016 AAD Summer Meeting — the Plenary session — from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Friday in Ballroom B. The session will feature five lectures as well as the President’s Address by Abel Torres, MD, JD.

A Boy from Akron Becomes a Professor at Harvard

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Harley Haynes, MD

The son of a dermatologist, Harley Haynes, MD, will discuss his father’s influence to describe how mentors helped shape his career direction and success, ultimately sharing clinical examples that emphasize the value of some of the lessons he has learned. His goal for his presentation of the Everett C. Fox, MD Memorial Lectureship is twofold.

“I hope my talk will reinforce the high value of mentorship with the accomplished audience and stimulate younger folks to seek mentorship and watch for opening doors,” said Dr. Haynes, vice chairman, emeritus, of the department of dermatology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and a professor of dermatology at Harvard Medical School, Boston.

Atopic Dermatitis as an Immune-Driven Disease and Implications for Therapeutics

Emma Guttman-Yassky, MD, PhD

Emma Guttman-Yassky, MD, PhD

Researchers have determined that eczema is a disease of the immune system, opening doors to improved, targeted therapies for patients with this disease. Two of these treatments are expected to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use next year. Eczema research and treatments will be discussed by Emma Guttman-Yassky, MD, PhD.

I believe that in the next three to five years the treatment armamentarium for eczema patients will be much improved and new treatments that target specific or broad immune molecules will also be able to revert the barrier defects that are characteristic of eczema,” said Dr. Guttman-Yassky, professor and vice chair of the department of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York.

Uncovering the Importance of Hair Disorders in the Skin of Color Patient

Amy McMichael, MD

Amy McMichael, MD

Amy McMichael, MD, has been a longtime advocate for treating the underlying causes of hair and scalp disorders and how they affect the quality of life for African-Americans. She will share how hair care practices such as using chemical relaxers, other chemicals, heat, and tight braiding can play a role in the development of several hair disorders in this population. The role of hair care practices in the development of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is particularly complex, especially because a genetic component likely plays a role.

“We must move away from the idea that CCCA is just caused by chemical relaxers because it predates chemical relaxers. We see people who have never relaxed their hair who have it,” said Dr. McMichael, professor and chair of dermatology at Wake Forest Baptist Health Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. “There is probably a genetic predisposition that is coupled with traction and other hair care practices.

“You don’t have to be in the patient’s shoes to understand how to address hair disorders in skin of color patients. I hope attendees appreciate that they can be knowledgeable when they approach these patients, and they can actually start to feel comfortable doing the treatments.”

Dermatology Research Advances that Will Shape Your Practice

Alexandra Boer Kimball, MD, MPH

Alexandra Boer Kimball, MD, MPH

Dermatology has seen groundbreaking advances in the treatment of melanoma and psoriasis in the past decade. Other research advances in four areas — topical treatments, precision medicine, technology, and big data — will fuel the development of even more novel treatments for skin-related diseases, said Alexandra Boer Kimball, MD, MPH.

“Research in dermatology — and I am talking about everything from bench research to epidemiology to outcomes — has really taken major strides forward in the past 10 years in a way that has profoundly affected everything we do today, and it is going to continue to evolve,” said Dr. Kimball, professor of dermatology at Harvard Medical School and director of the Clinical Unit for Research Trials and Outcomes in Skin.

Liberal Arts and Service: Getting Under Your Skin

Kevin Quigley

Kevin Quigley

Racial tension is growing in the United States and terrorist threats mount around the globe. Kevin Quigley sees a lack of understanding and empathy as a driver of these issues and he thinks that a renewed dedication to service could help reverse the trend.

“My message is to encourage everybody to find ways to advance service and put others in front of yourselves, and that is how all of us can become more empathetic. That is a quality our world desperately needs more of,” said Quigley, president of Marlboro College and one of the founders of the Building Bridges Coalition, who also has filled leadership roles in foundations and non-profits.

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